A Top Ten Freebie- My Favorite Couples

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Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly meme hosted by The Broke & the Bookish. It’s awesome. Every Tuesday, the lovely ladies over there give us book bloggers wonderful and fun topics to create our lists! Check out what others have posted by going over there!

http://brokeandbookish.blogspot.com

Today was a Freebie topic, so I looked over past topics that I missed and chose Top Ten Couples!

1.  Elizabeth Bennet & Mrs. Darcy– Pride & Prejudice

This is my absolute favorite literary couple.  I love the way their love story evolved.

 “But above all, above respect and esteem, there was a motive within her of good will which could not be overlooked. It was gratitude. — Gratitude, not merely for having once loved her, but for loving her still well enough to forgive all the petulance and acrimony of her manner in rejecting him and all the unjust accusations accompanying her rejection.”

2.  Kitty & Levin -Anna Karenina

This couple is the perfect balance against Anna and Vronsky

“He could not be mistaken. There were no other eyes like those in the world. There was only one creature in the world who could concentrate for him all the brightness and meaning of life. It was she. It was Kitty.” -Levin 

3.  Rhett Butler & Scarlett O’Hara– Gone With the Wind

The absolute passion and fireworks that come from theses two is breathtaking.  I have to believe that when tomorrow did come, they were together.

Rhett: Don’t start flirting with me. I’m not one of your plantation beauxs. I want more than flirting from you.
Scarlett: What do you want?
Rhett: I’ll tell you, Scarlett O’Hara, if you’ll take that Southern-belle simper off your face. Someday, I want you to say to me the words I heard you say to Ashley Wilkes: ‘I love you!’
Scarlett: That’s something you’ll never hear from me Captain Butler as long as you live.

4.  Stu Redman and Frannie Goldsmith – The Stand

“He held her and made her know it was all right without saying anything.  He didn’t tell her not to worry or that he would take care of everything, but he made love to her again and she thought that she had never been so happy.”

5.  Arwen & Aragorn The Lord of the Rings

“For I am the daughter of Elrond. I shall not go with him when he departs to the Havens: for mine is the choice of Luthien, and as she so have I chosen, both the sweet and the bitter.” 

6.  Peeta & Katniss– The Hunger Games

“Peeta, how come I never know when you’re having a nightmare?” I say.

“I don’t know. I don’t think I cry out or thrash around or anything. I just come to, paralyzed with terror,” he says.

“You should wake me,” I say, thinking about how I can interrupt his sleep two or three times on a bad night. About how long it can take to calm me down.

“It’s not necessary. My nightmares are usually about losing you,” he says. “I’m okay once I realize you’re here.

7-10.  Rounding it out with my favorite couples from the Harry Potter series-

Harry & Ginny

“And he knew that at that moment, they understood each other perfectly, and when he told her what he was going to do now, she would not say ‘be careful’ or ‘don’t do it’, but she would accept his decision because she would not have expected anything less of him.”

Ron & Hermione

Hermione came over and sat down in Parvati’s empty chair. She was a bit pink in the face from dancing.
‘Hi,’ said Harry. Ron didn’t say anything.
‘It’s hot, isn’t it?’ said Hermione, fanning herself with her hand. ‘Viktor’s just gone to get some drinks.’
Ron gave her a withering look. ‘Viktor?’ he said. ‘Hasn’t he asked you to call him Vicky yet?’
Hermione looked at him in surprise. ‘What’s up with you?’ she said.
‘If you don’t know,’ said Ron scathingly, ‘I’m not going to tell you.’ “

Lily Evans & Severus Snape

“Dumbledore watched her fly away, and as her silvery glow faded he turned back to Snape, and his eyes were full of tears.
“After all this time?”
“Always,” said Snape.”

Remus Lupin & Nymphadora Tonks

As Ginny and Hermione moved closer to the rest of the family, Harry had a clear view of the bodies lying next to Fred: Remus and Tonks, pale and still and peaceful-looking, apparently asleep beneath the dark, enchanted ceiling.”

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Make them a STAR- Characters who should get their own book-a Top Ten list

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Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly meme hosted by The Broke & the Bookish. It’s awesome. Every Tuesday, the lovely ladies over there give us book bloggers wonderful and fun topics to create our lists! Check out what others have posted by going over there!

http://brokeandbookish.blogspot.com

This week’s topic is –

Top Ten Characters You Wish Would Get Their Own Book

1. & 2  from Harry Potter

Sirius Black and Albus Dumbledore

Wouldn’t you love to know more about when Sirius meets James, or gets kicked out of the house by his crazy mother?  And what was Albus like as a kid?  Was he a know it all?

3.  from Macbeth

The Weird Sisters

These ladies are awesome- and pretty funny.

4.  from Rebecca

Mrs. Danvers

How did old Danny get so attached to Rebecca and why?

5. & 6.  from Lord of the Rings

Tom Bombadil and Legolas

I can’t even explain who Bombadil is- he just always was. Legolas now looks like Orlando Bloom in my mind, so of course I want more.

7.  from To Kill a Mockingbird

 Miss Maudie Atkinson

Why is she so nice?  Why isn’t she married?  Will she marry Atticus?  Buy Scout a dress?

8.  from The Stand

Ralph Bretner

We know more about the others who head West, but not much about Ralph.  Who was he before the plague?

9.  from Gone With the Wind

Ellen Robiard O’Hara

How did this elegant woman marry Gerald O’Hara?  How did she produce a child like Scarlet?

10.  from Jane Eyre

Bertha Mason

I need to know more about this crazy beauty.  Was she ever sane?  Did she want to marry Edward?

I Wish I Could Go There- a Top Ten List

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Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly meme hosted by The Broke & the Bookish. It’s awesome. Every Tuesday, the lovely ladies over there give us book bloggers wonderful and fun topics to create our lists! Check out what others have posted by going over there!

http://brokeandbookish.blogspot.com

This week’s topic is –

Top Ten Places I would love to visit from Books (real or fictional)

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1.  New Orleans- from almost every Anne Rice book.

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2.  Rivendell- to hang out at the last homely house with Elrond

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3.  Hogwarts from the HP series

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4.  Paris, 1920s- Fitzgerald

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5.  Pemberley- from Pride & Prejudice

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6.  Hobbiton from The Lord of the Rings

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7.  Tara Plantation from Gone With the Wind

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8.  Italy- really Naples, from Eat, Pray, Love

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9. The South of France from Tender is the Night

Where do you wish you could visit?

What A Classic!! A Top Ten List

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Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly meme hosted by The Broke & the Bookish. It’s awesome. Every Tuesday, the lovely ladies over there give us book bloggers wonderful and fun topics to create our lists! Check out what others have posted by going over there!

http://brokeandbookish.blogspot.com

This week’s topic is-

Top Ten Favorite Classics-or- Top Ten Classics I Want to Read

Since I have been absent from my blog for so long, I figured I would do both, so here it goes!

Top Ten Favorite Classics

1.Pride & Prejudice

2.  Little Women

3.  To Kill A Mockingbird

4.  Gone With the Wind

5.  Jane Eyre

6.  Rebecca

7.  The Painted Veil

8.  The Sun Also Rises

9.  Brave New World

10.  The Lord of The Rings

Top Ten Classics I WANT to Read

1.  1984

2.  East of Eden

3.  Wuthering Heights

4.  The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes

5.  The Bell Jar

6.  A Tale of Two Cities

7.  Paradise Lost

8.  Great Expectations

9.  The Divine Comedy

10.  Lady Chatterly’s Lover

What are your favorite classics?

Leave a comment- I love to hear from you!

 

Those who do not know history….a Top Ten list

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Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly meme hosted by The Broke & the Bookish.  It’s awesome. Every Tuesday, the lovely ladies over there give us book bloggers wonderful and fun topics to create our lists!  Check out what others have posted by going over there! http://brokeandbookish.blogspot.com

This week’s topic is-

 Top Ten All Time Books in X Genre

I have chosen Historical Fiction as my genre.  What is historical fiction?  It is fiction “written in a setting drawn from history and often containing historical persons” (thanks Wikipedia).  This is the way I view historical fiction, but lots of lists include an alarming number of books that include much bosom heaving and words like Queen and Princess in the titles.  While I like heaving breasts and rippling muscles as much as the next gal, I do not usually count that as historical fiction, therefore my list doesn’t contain any.

1.  Gone With the WInd

by Margaret Mitchell

Ok, there is much romance and drama here, but, at it’s very core, GWTW is historical fiction at it’s best.

Set against the dramatic backdrop of the American Civil War, Margaret Mitchell’s epic love story is an unforgettable tale of love and loss, of a nation mortally divided and its people forever changed. At the heart of all this chaos is the story of beautiful, ruthless Scarlett ‘O’ Hara and the dashing soldier of fortune, Rhett Butler.

2.  Burr

by Gore Vidal

I loved this book when I read it in college.  Vidal brought Arron Burr to life.

Burr is a portrait of perhaps the most complex and misunderstood of the Founding Fathers. In 1804, while serving as vice president, Aaron Burr fought a duel with his political nemesis, Alexander Hamilton, and killed him. In 1807, he was arrested, tried, and acquitted of treason. In 1833, Burr is newly married, an aging statesman considered a monster by many. Burr retains much of his political influence if not the respect of all. And he is determined to tell his own story. As his amanuensis, he chooses Charles Schermerhorn Schuyler, a young New York City journalist, and together they explore both Burr’s past and the continuing political intrigues of the still young United States.

3.  The Scarlet Letter

by Nathaniel Hawthorne

My heart ached for Hester, stuck with all of those Puritans.

Set in the harsh Puritan community of seventeenth-century Boston, this tale of an adulterous entanglement that results in an illegitimate birth reveals Nathaniel Hawthorne’s concerns with the tension between the public and the private selves. Publicly disgraced and ostracized, Hester Prynne draws on her inner strength and certainty of spirit to emerge as the first true heroine of American fiction. Arthur Dimmesdale, trapped by the rules of society, stands as a classic study of a self divided.

4.  The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society

by  Mary Anne Shaffer and Annie Barrows

I loved this story of life on the small English island during and after WWII.

“ I wonder how the book got to Guernsey? Perhaps there is some sort of secret homing instinct in books that brings them to their perfect readers.”January 1946: London is emerging from the shadow of the Second World War, and writer Juliet Ashton is looking for her next book subject. Who could imagine that she would find it in a letter from a man she’s never met, a native of the island of Guernsey, who has come across her name written inside a book by Charles Lamb….

5.  The Red Tent

by Anita Diamant

This reading this book really did something to me.  It affected me.  I didn’t want the story to end.

Her name is Dinah. In the Bible, her life is only hinted at in a brief and violent detour within the more familiar chapters of the Book of Genesis that are about her father, Jacob, and his dozen sons. Told in Dinah’s voice, this novel reveals the traditions and turmoils of ancient womanhood–the world of the red tent. It begins with the story of her mothers–Leah, Rachel, Zilpah, and Bilhah–the four wives of Jacob. They love Dinah and give her gifts that sustain her through a hard-working youth, a calling to midwifery, and a new home in a foreign land. Dinah’s story reaches out from a remarkable period of early history and creates an intimate connection with the past. Deeply affecting, The Red Tent combines rich storytelling with a valuable achievement in modern fiction: a new view of biblical women’s society.

6.  The Poisonwood Bible

by Barbara Kingsolver

I love stories that take place in colonial Africa.  The way the author tells the story through the women of the family is priceless, especially the voice of the eldest daughter.

The Poisonwood Bible is a story told by the wife and four daughters of Nathan Price, a fierce, evangelical Baptist who takes his family and mission to the Belgian Congo in 1959. They carry with them everything they believe they will need from home, but soon find that all of it — from garden seeds to Scripture — is calamitously transformed on African soil. What follows is a suspenseful epic of one family’s tragic undoing and remarkable reconstruction over the course of three decades in postcolonial Africa.

7.  The Name of the Rose

by Umberto Eco

This was a great book and a pretty terrific movie with the ever delicious Sean Connery and Christian Slater.

The year is 1327. Franciscans in a wealthy Italian abbey are suspected of heresy, and Brother William of Baskerville arrives to investigate. When his delicate mission is suddenly overshadowed by seven bizarre deaths, Brother William turns detective. His tools are the logic of Aristotle, the theology of Aquinas, the empirical insights of Roger Bacon—all sharpened to a glistening edge by wry humor and a ferocious curiosity. He collects evidence, deciphers secret symbols and coded manuscripts, and digs into the eerie labyrinth of the abbey, where “the most interesting things happen at night.”

8.  The House of the Spirits

by Isabel Allende

I wasn’t 100% sure if I could categorize this as historical fiction, but I am going to give it a shot.  I feel that the author pours so much of her own history into her work and that is especially true in her first, and best novel.  The story follows the Trueba family and traces the post colonial social and political upheavals of Chile.  I read it years ago, and I think it is time of a reread.

In one of the most important and beloved Latin American works of the twentieth century, Isabel Allende weaves a luminous tapestry of three generations of the Trueba family, revealing both triumphs and tragedies. Here is patriarch Esteban, whose wild desires and political machinations are tempered only by his love for his ethereal wife, Clara, a woman touched by an otherworldly hand. Their daughter, Blanca, whose forbidden love for a man Esteban has deemed unworthy infuriates her father, yet will produce his greatest joy: his granddaughter Alba, a beautiful, ambitious girl who will lead the family and their country into a revolutionary future.

9.  The Historian

by Elizabeth Kostova

A long book, but well worth it.  A story within a story, within a story, all leading to Vlad the Impaler.

Late one night, exploring her father’s library, a young woman finds an ancient book and a cache of yellowing letters addressed ominously to ‘My dear and unfortunate successor’. Her discovery plunges her into a world she never dreamed of – a labyrinth where the secrets of her father’s past and her mother’s mysterious fate connect to an evil hidden in the depths of history

10.  One Hundred Year of Solitude

by Gabriel Garcia Marquez

This is one of the most amazing (and at times confusing) historical fiction novels.  You will be sweet away by this lyrical tale.

One of the 20th century’s enduring works, One Hundred Years of Solitude is a widely beloved and acclaimed novel known throughout the world, and the ultimate achievement of a Nobel Prize winning career.
The novel tells the story of the rise and fall of the mythical town of Macondo through the history of the family. It is a rich and brilliant chronicle of life and death, and the tragicomedy of humankind. In the noble, ridiculous, beautiful, and tawdry story of the family, one sees all of humanity, just as in the history, myths, growth, and decay of Macondo, one sees all of Latin America.

Cry Me a River- a Top Ten List

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Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly meme hosted by The Broke & the Bookish.  It’s awesome. Every Tuesday, the lovely ladies over there give us book bloggers wonderful and fun topics to create our lists!  Check out what others have posted by going over there! http://brokeandbookish.blogspot.com

This week’s topic is-

Top Ten Rewind- and I picked Books That Made Me Cry (originally done 11/10)

I tried this topic because it made me think.  Usually when someone tells me a book is a really tear jerker, I will shy away from it.  Why read something you know is going to make you sad?  But here are a few that snuck up on me-

Major Spoiler Alert in each comment

1. & 2  Harry Potter and The Half Blood Prince AND The Deathly Hallows.

I was all good until the end of book 6.  I recall literally throwing the books across the room.  How could Dumbleldore DIE????  I was totally done with the whole thing, then beta reading it from the beginning.

And #7- don’t get me started.  Dobby, Fred, Lupin, and Tonks!!  By the end, I was numb.

3. The Fault in Our Stars

Ok, kids with cancer is very bad, so it is no surprise that this is a sad book, right?  But to see them fall in love, then die a long painful death- too much.

4.  The Book Thief

When Death is the narrator, you know people will die, no?  But when he describes taking each of them, it got to me.

5.  The Giving Tree

Laugh at me if you will, but just try reading it to your child without crying.  When she says she has nothing left to give, I lose it.  I once choked up while reading it to a class of 2nd graders.

6.  Suzanne’s Diary for Nicholas

This was a surprise- I mean, it IS written by James Patterson of Alex Cross fame.

7.  My Sister’s Keeper

What an ending!!!  I love surprise endings!

8.  We Need to Talk About Kevin

I knew all along there was a school “incident”, but I was unrepared for what actually happened at the school, or what happened at their home.  A  nightmare.

9.  Gone With the Wind

Scarlet might not be the nicest woman, but man does she lose all the women closest to her- mother, daughter, best friend.  Each of these death’s changes her.

10.  Marley & Me

I have a yellow lab named Katie (after Katie Scarlet O’Hara)  who is about to turn 11.  I love her and her goofy step brother Jack the choc. lab.  Like my children.  I have had dogs my whole life and I know we are only blessed with them a short time, but that really doesn’t prepare you for the pain that comes when you have to say goodbye to them.  Especially if you are there with them, as an owner should be.  I am crying just writing this.

The scene where he goes to the vet to put Marley down is one of the saddest things I have ever read.  This is one book I cannot reread, because it is too sad for me.

I know- cancer, massacres, etc. I can do, but when the dog dies, I just can’t.

What books made you cry?

Top Ten Favorite Beginnings and Endings

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Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly meme hosted by The Broke & the Bookish.  It’s awesome. Every Tuesday, the lovely ladies over there give us book bloggers wonderful and fun topics to create our lists!  Check out what others have posted by going over there! http://brokeandbookish.blogspot.com

This week’s topic is

Top Ten Favorite Beginnings and Endings

1.  Pride & Prejudice (beginning)

It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune must be in want of a wife.

2.  The Great Gatsby (ending)

And so we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past.

3.  Rebecca (beginning)

Last night I dreamt I went to Manderley again . . . I came upon it suddenly; the approach masked by the unnatural growth of a vast shrub that spread in all directions . . . There was Manderley, our Manderley, secretive and silent as it had always been, the gray stone shining in the moonlight of my dream, the mullioned windows reflecting the green lawns and terrace. Time could not wreck the perfect symmetry of those walls, nor the site itself, a jewel in the hollow of a hand.

4.  Harry Potter and The Sorcerer’s Stone (beginning)

Mr. and Mrs. Dursley, of number four, Privet Drive, were proud to say that they were perfectly normal, thank you very much. They were the last people you’d expect to be involved in anything strange or mysterious, because they just didn’t hold with such nonsense.

5.  Anna Karenina (beginning)

Happy families are all alike; every unhappy family is unhappy in its own way.

6.  Gone with the Wind (ending)

I’ll think of it all tomorrow at Tara.  I can stand it then.  Tomorrow, I’ll think of some way to get him back.  After all, tomorrow is another day.

7.  Frankenstein (ending)

He was soon borne away by the waves and lost in darkness and distance.
8.  The Book Thief (beginning)

First the colours, Then the humans, Thats how I usually see things, Or at least, how I try. Here is a small fact, You are going to die.

9.  Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows (ending)

The scar had not pained Harry for nineteen years. All was well.

and finally….

10.  The Book Thief (ending)

I wanted to tell the book thief many things, about beauty and brutality. But what could I tell her about those things that she didn’t already know? I wanted to explain that I am constantly overestimating and underestimating the human race–that rarely do I ever simply estimate it. I wanted to ask her how the same thing could be so ugly and so glorious, and its words and stories so damning and brilliant.

All I was able to do was turn to Liesel Meminger and tell her the only truth I truly know. I said it to the book thief and I say it now to you.

* * * A LAST NOTE FROM YOUR NARRATOR * * *
I am haunted by humans.